Staff

 

Marshal German

Marshal German (Program Manager, Public Health Certificate in Indigenous Health) was born in St. Paul, Minnesota and grew up in Amiskwaciwâskahikan, Treaty 6 (Edmonton, Alberta) with his Mother, Grandmother and Sister. His background is of mixed Russian, Irish, African America, and Nêhiyaw (Cree) descent with kinship ties to the Netsilik region of Kitikmeot, Nunavut. After graduating from the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, where he worked for the Métis Archival Project, Marshal become involved in conducting land use research with Terry Tobias, working for First Nations and Indigenous organization across Canada and Australia. While obtaining his Masters in Social Work from the University of Toronto, he worked in several community initiatives for low-income and homeless seniors, establishing arts programs, conducting gerontological research and working for the Toronto Alliance to End Homelessness. His many summers out on the land hunting and fishing with Netsilingmiut family and Elders provided strong personal experiences for the intersection of culture, land rights and health.
 
Email: marshal.german@ubc.ca
 
Phone: 416.806.2422
 
Miranda Kelly

Miranda Kelly

Miranda Kelly, BSc, MPH (Education Coordinator- UBC Learning Circle) is Stό:lō and was raised in her home community, Soowahlie First Nation. She has enjoyed living in Coast Salish territory her whole life, and has lived in Vancouver since 2009.

Miranda holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and psychology from the University of Victoria, and a Master of Public Health degree from the University of British Columbia. She has held a variety of roles in Aboriginal health research, and was employed in health policy and planning at the First Nations Health Authority from 2011-2016.

Miranda volunteers as a member of the Public Policy Committee of the Canadian Public Health Association, and Board of Director for the Mavis McMullen Housing Society.
 
Email: miranda.kelly@ubc.ca
 
Phone: (604) 822-2886

 

Savanah Knockwood

Savanah Knockwood (Indigenous Student Programs Coordinator) is a member of the Mi’kmaq First Nation and is originally from Fredericton, New Brunswick. She received a Bachelor of Arts from UBC, where she studied Korean Language and Culture. In her final semester she created & co-ordinated a seminar in Korean Adoptee Literature as part of the Student Directed Seminars Program. She previously worked with the Faculty of Arts at UBC as their Aboriginal Student Peer Advisor, where she worked with the Aboriginal Student Affairs team to promote and support Aboriginal student success. She has also worked with the Women’s Issue Branch of the Government of New Brunswick where she researched and authored a fact sheet on violence against Aboriginal women for use by non-Aboriginal service providers. She has worked with the Native Studies Department at Saint Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick as a Research Assistant. In her current role with the Centre, Savanah is dedicated to enhancing Aboriginal student success and participation in the health sciences programs at UBC.

Email: savanah.knockwood@ubc.ca

Phone: (604) 827-4000

Jennifer Mackie

Jennifer Mackie

Jennifer Mackie (Administrative Manager) is Nak’azdli (Yinka Dene, Frog clan) on her mother’s side and Scottish on her father’s side. Jen’s previous work includes project management for the Aboriginal Health Strategy Working Group on the implementation of the Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health,  qualitative community based health research projects that focus on land health, health assessment and the environmental assessment process, and on culturally safe dementia care. She completed graduate studies in the Community Health Science program (MSc) at the University of Northern British Columbia in 2012. Jen manages the administrative operations and facilitates the strategic approach for the development of the Centre. She has been living, working and playing in the beautiful unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples on and off since 1991 and enjoys spending time with friends and family, and playing her ukulele.

Email: aboriginal.health@ubc.ca

Phone: (604) 822-5586

Divina Ridley

Divina Ridley

Divina Ridley (Program Coordinator), is of the Nisga’a/Tsimshian/Gitksan Nation, was raised in Gitxaala, and hails from Wilps WisinXbi’ilkw in Nisga’a and Wilps Dak’aam Haast in Gitk’san.  Divina belongs to the Giskaast tribe and has been living in Ts’amiks (Vancouver) for 26 years. She majored in Family Science and Women’s Studies in UBC. She is currently working as a Program Coordinator at the UBC Learning Circle. Her position as Program Coordinator entails booking, coordinating, communication, advocating for the UBC Learning Circle and Youth Circle, marketing, web-updating, technical assistance setting up and ensuring that the equipment are in good working order for webinars and videoconferences, as well as editing videos. She has also worked similarily with the UBC Summer Science and Aboriginal Health and Community Administration program where she also recruited students in both programs.

Email: divina.ridley@ubc.ca

Phone: (604) 827-5454

Patricia Spittal

Patricia Spittal

Dr. Patricia Spittal (Interim Associate Director – Research) is an anthropologist whose work addresses HIV related vulnerabilities of marginalized communities living in both resource rich and poor countries. She is the Principal Investigator of the Cedar Project, a CIHR-funded initiative to better understand the sexual and drug related vulnerabilities of Aboriginal youth who use drugs. She and her research team from Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Kampala, Uganda and Lacor Hospital, Gulu also received CIHR funding to establish a similar prospective cohort in Northern Uganda called the “Cango Lyec Project” (Healing the Elephant), addressing the HIV vulnerabilities of people affected by conflict in Northern Uganda. Dr. Spittal worked with a multi-disciplinary team leading to the successful development of the new Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health. As Head, she is committed to building the Health in Populations Division at the School of Population and Public Health, and furthering Aboriginal health initiatives at UBC. She is also dedicated to her work in Northern Uganda. She was instrumental in the recent signing of a MOU between the Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Uganda and UBC’s Faculty of Medicine, and currently has two PhD students being mentored by faculty at Makerere.

Email: spittal@sm.hivnet.ubc.ca.

Phone: (604) 806-8779

Carrie Anne Vanderhoop

 Carrie Anne Vanderhoop, K’iinuwaas, (Education Coordinator-Curriculum Development) is the daughter of Evelyn Vanderhoop and granddaughter of Delores Churchill, of the Gawa Git’ans, Masset Inlet Eagle Clan of Old Massett, Haida Gwaii.  Carrie Anne’s father is David Vanderhoop, Aquinnah Wampanoag from the island of Neope, commonly known as Martha’s Vineyard.Carrie Anne has over fifteen years of experience working in the field of education, and most recently held the position of Academic Lead/Project Curriculum Manager at the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society.

Carrie Anne holds an Ed.M. from Harvard University Graduate School of Education and a B.A. in Comparative Literature and Sociology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Carrie Anne comes from a long line of Haida weavers and carries on the tradition as a weaver of Raven’s Tail and Naaxiin textile garments.   When she is not working or weaving, she enjoys spending time outdoors with her young daughter.

Email: carrieanne.vanderhoop@ubc.ca

Phone: 604-822-3453

Leah Walker

Leah Walker

Leah Walker (Associate Director, Education) is of Danish, English and Nlakapamux ancestry and has strong family ties with Sto:lo Nation at Seabird Island. Leah is very interested in work that involves community partnerships, cultural safety, and working with medical and other health professionals in developing skills to better serve our communities. She currently teaches IHHS 409: International Indigenous Experiences of Colonization, and IHHS 408: Topics in Aboriginal Health: A Community Based Experience that situate health professional students in First Nations communities to work with and learn from the people. Leah also facilitates a variety of workshops and sessions in cultural safety and Indigenous medical education. She is currently working with the communities of Skidegate and Old Massett on a Cultural Safety Project, as well as internationally on a five-year CIHR funded grant with partners in New Zealand, Australia and in Canada entitled “Educating for Equity: Exploring how Health Professional Education can Reduce Disparities in Chronic Disease Care and Improve Outcomes for Indigenous Populations.

Email: leah.walker@ubc.ca

Phone: (604) 822-5973